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High Availability: DRBD (DEPRECATED)

Warning

This topic is deprecated as of the 12.9 release of the Chef servver. For the latest information on high availability and how to set up a highly-available server cluster, see High Availability: Backend Cluster .

This topic describes how to set up the Chef server for high availability using physical machines and DRBD.

Prerequisites

Before installing the Chef server software, perform the following steps:

  • Backend servers should have a dedicated connection. This is required for replication between the two servers.
  • Backend servers will share a virtual IP address that must also be accessible from each frontend server. This virtual IP address is created and managed by the Chef server, but will also need to be added to the DNS so that all servers in the high availability configuration may access it.
  • Persistent data on backend servers of the Chef server is primarily composed of cookbook files and directories. Separate disks should be dedicated entirely to storing this data prior to installing the Chef server.
  • Load-balancing should be used with frontend machines, along with a DNS entry for the virtual IP address used for load balancing. This virtual IP address is added to the chef-server.rb file as the api_fqdn.
  • All required ports must be open. See the Firewalls section (below) for the list of ports. All connections to and from the Chef server are accomplished via TCP. Refer to the operating system’s manual or your systems administrators for instructions on how to configure to ports, if necessary.
  • The hostname for the Chef server must be an FQDN, including the domain suffix, and must be resolvable by the other backend and frontend servers. See Hostnames, FQDNs for more information.

Disk Configuration

Persistent data on a backend Chef server is primarily composed of cookbook files and directories. Separate disks should be dedicated entirely to storing this data prior to installing the Chef server. These disks should:

  • Utilize hardware RAID
  • Be configured in either RAID1 or RAID5
  • Be identical across both of your backend servers

The recommended configuration utilizes the Linux logical volume manager (LVM) as the backing store for DRBD. This assumes that:

  • ~300GB of raw, unpartitioned disk space is available
  • The disk space presents as a single device, /dev/sdb
  • The storage is added to a volume group named opscode
  • The storage is added in a logical volume group named drbd
  • The volume group should have adequate space to enable logical volume manager (LVM) snapshots to be used for backups; this amount depends on many factors, including how much changes in-between snapshots, how long the snapshots will be kept, and the (eventual) size of the Chef server database; a decent starting point when sizing logical volume manager (LVM) snapshots is ~10% of the raw, unpartitioned disk space

The following commands would properly set up the backend disk configuration for DRBD:

$ pvcreate /dev/sdb

and:

$ vgcreate opscode /dev/sdb

and:

$ lvcreate -l 80%VG -n drbd opscode

Warning

Talk with your systems administrators about disk configuration if you are at all uncertain of how to configure a new logical volume with logical volume manager (LVM), as the operations can be destructive.

chef-server.rb

Each Chef server in a high availabilty configuration must have an identical chef-server.rb file that is located in the /etc/opscode/ directory on each server. This file describes the topology of the high availability configuration. On the primary backend server, create a file named chef-server.rb and save it in the /etc/opscode/ directory.

Add the following settings to the chef-server.rb file:

  1. Define the topology type:

    topology "ha"
  2. Define the primary backend server:

    server "FQDN",
      :ipaddress => "IP_ADDRESS",
      :role => "backend",
      :bootstrap => true,
      :cluster_ipaddress => "CLUSTER_IPADDRESS"

    Replace FQDN with the FQDN of the server and IP_ADDRESS with the IP address of the server. The role is a backend server is "backend". If the backend server is used to bootstrap the Chef server installation, replace CLUSTER_IPADDRESS with the IP address of the interface that is used for cluster communications. For example, the same IP address that is used by Keepalived and DRBD. If the Chef server is not used to bootstrap the Chef server installation, exclude the :cluster_ipaddress entry.

  3. Define the secondary backend server:

    server "FQDN",
      :ipaddress => "IPADDRESS",
      :role => "backend",
      :cluster_ipaddress => "CLUSTER_IPADDRESS"

    Replace FQDN with the FQDN of the server, and IPADDRESS with the IP address of the server. Replace CLUSTER_IPADDRESS with the IP address of the server’s interface assigned for cluster communications. If no such interface is configured, exclude the cluster_ipaddress entry.

  4. Define the backend virtual IP address:

    backend_vip "FQDN",
      :ipaddress => "IP_ADDRESS",
      :device => "eth0"

    Replace FQDN with the FQDN of the server. Replace IP_ADDRESS with the virtual IP address of the server. The :device parameter should be the ethernet interface to which the floater virtual IP address will bind. This is typically the public interface of the server.

  5. Define each frontend server:

    server "FQDN",
      :ipaddress => "IP_ADDRESS",
      :role => "frontend"

    Replace FQDN with the FQDN of the frontend server. Replace IP_ADDRESS with the IP address of the frontend server. Set :role to "frontend".

    Add separate entry in the chef-server.rb file for each frontend server.

  6. Define the API FQDN:

    api_fqdn "FQDN"

    Replace FQDN with the FQDN of the load balanced virtual IP address, which should be equal to the FQDN for the service URI that is used by the Chef server.

  7. Reconfigure the Chef server and the Chef management console (standalone and frontend group members

    of a High Availabilty installation):

    $ sudo chef-server-ctl reconfigure
    $ sudo chef-manage-ctl reconfigure

Primary Backend

Use the following steps to set up the primary backend Chef server:

  1. Download the packages from http://downloads.chef.io/chef-server/. For Red Hat and CentOS 6:

    $ rpm -Uvh /tmp/chef-server-core-<version>.rpm

    For Ubuntu:

    $ dpkg -i /tmp/chef-server-core-<version>.deb

    After a few minutes, the Chef server will be installed.

  2. Create a file named chef-server.rb that is located in the /etc/opscode/ directory. See the chef-server.rb section below for an example of the settings and values that are required.

  3. Install DRBD. These steps vary, depending on the platform.

    For Ubuntu:

    $ apt-get install drbd8-utils

    For RedHat and CentOS (all versions), first check for the xen kernel:

    $ rpm -qa kernel\* | grep -ci xen

    If anything other than 0 is returned, the machine is running the xen kernel.

    For RedHat and CentOS 6.6, install ELRepo:

    $ rpm --import http://elrepo.org/RPM-GPG-KEY-elrepo.org

    and then:

    $ rpm -Uvh http://elrepo.org/elrepo-release-6-5.el6.elrepo.noarch.rpm

    Note

    The ELRepo provides updated drivers for the Linux family of enterprise distributions (based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux.) With the introduction of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6, Red Hat no longer distributes DRBD within the kernel. These modules provide properly built, community tested releases of the required kernel and DRBD userland.

    If the server returned 0 for the xen kernel, run:

    $ yum install -y drbd84-utils kmod-drbd84

    If the server returned something other than 0, run:

    $ yum install -y drbd84-utils kmod-drbd84-xen

    For RedHat and CentOS 6.5, install ELRepo:

    $ rpm --import http://elrepo.org/RPM-GPG-KEY-elrepo.org

    and then:

    $ rpm -Uvh http://elrepo.org/elrepo-release-6-5.el6.elrepo.noarch.rpm

    Note

    The ELRepo provides updated drivers for the Linux family of enterprise distributions (based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux.) With the introduction of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6, Red Hat no longer distributes DRBD within the kernel. These modules provide properly built, community tested releases of the required kernel and DRBD userland.

    If the server returned 0 for the xen kernel, run:

    $ yum install -y drbd84-utils kmod-drbd84-8.4.5-1.el6.elrepo

    If the server returned something other than 0, run:

    $ yum install -y drbd84-utils kmod-drbd84-xen-8.4.5-1.el6.elrepo

    For RedHat and CentOS 5.11, install ELRepo:

    $ rpm --import http://elrepo.org/RPM-GPG-KEY-elrepo.org

    and then:

    $ rpm -Uvh http://www.elrepo.org/elrepo-release-5-5.el5.elrepo.noarch.rpm

    Note

    The ELRepo provides updated drivers for the Linux family of enterprise distributions (based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux.) With the introduction of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6, Red Hat no longer distributes DRBD within the kernel. These modules provide properly built, community tested releases of the required kernel and DRBD userland.

    If the server returned 0 for the xen kernel, run:

    $ yum install -y drbd84-utils kmod-drbd84

    If the server returned something other than 0, run:

    $ yum install -y drbd84-utils kmod-drbd84-xen
  4. Reconfigure the Chef server and the Chef management console (standalone and frontend group members

    of a High Availabilty installation):

    $ sudo chef-server-ctl reconfigure
    $ sudo chef-manage-ctl reconfigure

    This will configure DRBD. The installer will pause and ask for confirmation that DRBD has been set up. Confirm (CTRL-C), and then run the following commands:

    $ drbdadm create-md pc0

    then:

    $ drbdadm up pc0

Secondary Backend

Use the following steps to set up the secondary backend Chef server:

  1. Repeat the same steps as described for the primary backend server.

  2. Create the /etc/opscode/ directory, and then copy the entire contents of the /etc/opscode directory from the primary backend server, including all certificates and the chef-server.rb file.

  3. Reconfigure the Chef server and the Chef management console (standalone and frontend group members

    of a High Availabilty installation):

    $ sudo chef-server-ctl reconfigure
    $ sudo chef-manage-ctl reconfigure

    This will configure DRBD. The installer will pause and ask for confirmation that DRBD has been set up. Confirm (CTRL-C), and then run the following commands:

    $ drbdadm create-md pc0

    then:

    $ drbdadm up pc0

Establish Failover

To establish failover between the two backend servers, do the following:

  1. On the primary backend server, define it as the primary shared device. For Red Hat and CentOS 6:

    $ drbdadm primary --force pc0

    For Ubuntu:

    $ drbdadm -- --overwrite-data-of-peer primary pc0
  2. On the primary backend server, mount the file system. For example, a file system named ext4:

    $ mkfs.ext4 /dev/drbd0

    then:

    $ mkdir -p /var/opt/opscode/drbd/data

    and then:

    $ mount /dev/drbd0 /var/opt/opscode/drbd/data
  3. Synchronize DRBD. This process MUST be allowed to complete to ensure that DRBD is synchronized with all devices.

    Note

    Under normal operation, DRBD dedicates only a portion of the available disk bandwidth to initial/complete re-synchronization. This ensures that new data written to the shared device is also synchronized.

    DRBD can be configured to utilize more bandwidth during the initial synchronization. For Red Hat and CentOS 6:

    $ drbdadm disk-options --resync-rate=1100M pc0

    For Ubuntu:

    $ drbdsetup /dev/drbd0 syncer -r 1100M

    To observe the synchronization process, run the following:

    $ watch -n1 cat /proc/drbd

    Output similar to the following will be shown:

    cat /proc/drbd output
    
    version: 8.4.1 (api:1/proto:86[STRIKEOUT:100)
    GIT-hash: 91b4c048c1a0e06777b5f65d312b38d47abaea80 build by
    dag@Build64R6, 2011]12[STRIKEOUT:21 06:08:50
      0: cs:SyncSource ro:Primary/Secondary ds:UpToDate/Inconsistent C r]—-
      ns:3071368 nr:0 dw:0 dr:3075736 al:0 bm:187 lo:0 pe:13 ua:4 ap:0 ep:1
      wo:b oos:12685660
      [==>……………..] sync'ed: 19.5% (12388/15372)M
      finish: 0:11:00 speed: 19,188 (24,468) K/sec

    Synchronization is complete hen the ds: section reads UpToDate/UpToDate.

  4. When synchronization is complete, run the following command on the primary backend server:

    $ touch /var/opt/opscode/drbd/drbd_ready
  5. Reconfigure the primary Chef server:

    $ sudo chef-server-ctl reconfigure
  6. Run the following command on the secondary backend server:

    $ touch /var/opt/opscode/drbd/drbd_ready
  7. Reconfigure the secondary Chef server:

    $ sudo chef-server-ctl reconfigure

Frontend

For each frontend server, use the following steps to set up the Chef server:

  1. Install the Chef server package. For Red Hat and CentOS 6:

    $ rpm -Uvh /tmp/chef-server-core-<version>.rpm

    For Ubuntu:

    $ dpkg -i /tmp/chef-server-core-<version>.deb

    After a few minutes, the Chef server will be installed.

  2. Create the /etc/opscode/ directory, and then copy the entire contents of the /etc/opscode directory from the primary backend server, including all certificates and the chef-server.rb file.

  3. Reconfigure the Chef server and the Chef management console (standalone and frontend group members

    of a High Availabilty installation):

    $ sudo chef-server-ctl reconfigure
    $ sudo chef-manage-ctl reconfigure
  4. Start the Chef server:

    $ sudo chef-server-ctl start
  5. Run the following command to create an administrator:

    $ chef-server-ctl user-create USER_NAME FIRST_NAME LAST_NAME EMAIL 'PASSWORD' --filename FILE_NAME

    An RSA private key is generated automatically. This is the user’s private key and should be saved to a safe location. The --filename option will save the RSA private key to a specified path.

    For example:

    $ chef-server-ctl user-create stevedanno Steve Danno steved@chef.io 'abc123' --filename /path/to/stevedanno.pem
  6. Run the following command to create an organization:

    $ chef-server-ctl org-create short_name 'full_organization_name' --association_user user_name --filename ORGANIZATION-validator.pem

    The name must begin with a lower-case letter or digit, may only contain lower-case letters, digits, hyphens, and underscores, and must be between 1 and 255 characters. For example: 4thcoffee.

    The full name must begin with a non-white space character and must be between 1 and 1023 characters. For example: 'Fourth Coffee, Inc.'.

    The --association_user option will associate the user_name with the admins security group on the Chef server.

    An RSA private key is generated automatically. This is the chef-validator key and should be saved to a safe location. The --filename option will save the RSA private key to a specified path.

    For example:

    $ chef-server-ctl org-create 4thcoffee 'Fourth Coffee, Inc.' --association_user stevedanno --filename /path/to/4thcoffee-validator.pem
  7. Reconfigure the Chef server and the Chef management console (standalone and frontend group members

    of a High Availabilty installation):

    $ sudo chef-server-ctl reconfigure
    $ sudo chef-manage-ctl reconfigure

Enable Features

Enable additional features of the Chef server! The packages may be downloaded directly as part of the installation process or they may be first downloaded to a local directory, and then installed.

Use Downloads

The install subcommand downloads packages from https://packages.chef.io/ by default. For systems that are not behind a firewall (and have connectivity to https://packages.chef.io/), the Chef management console package can be installed as described below:

Chef Manage

Use Chef management console to manage data bags, attributes, run-lists, roles, environments, and cookbooks from a web user interface.

On each front end server in the Chef server configuration, run:

$ chef-server-ctl install chef-manage

then:

$ chef-server-ctl reconfigure

and then:

$ chef-manage-ctl reconfigure

This updates the Chef server and creates the /etc/opscode-manage/secrets.rb file. When running the Chef management console 1.11 (or higher), copy the secrets.rb file in the /etc/opscode-manage directory on one of the frontend servers to the same directory on each of the other frontend servers, and then rerun chef-manage-ctl reconfigure so the copied /etc/opscode-manage/secrets.rb file gets used correctly.

Note

Starting with the Chef management console 2.3.0, the Chef MLSA must be accepted when reconfiguring the product. If the Chef MLSA has not already been accepted, the reconfigure process will prompt for a yes to accept it. Or run chef-manage-ctl reconfigure --accept-license to automatically accept the license.

Use Local Packages

The install subcommand downloads packages from https://packages.chef.io/ by default. For systems that are behind a firewall (and may not have connectivity to packages.chef.io), these packages can be downloaded from https://downloads.chef.io/chef-manage/, and then installed manually. First download the package that is appropriate for the platform, save it to a local path, and then run the install command using the --path option to specify the directory in which the package is located:

$ chef-server-ctl install PACKAGE_NAME --path /path/to/package/directory

For example:

$ chef-server-ctl install chef-manage --path /root/packages

The chef-server-ctl command will install the first chef-manage package found in the /root/packages directory.

Install Reporting

To set up the Reporting server:

  1. Install the package on each frontend and backend Chef server:

    $ chef-server-ctl install opscode-reporting
  2. Reconfigure the Chef server on the backend primary server (bootstrap):

    $ chef-server-ctl reconfigure
  3. Reconfigure the Reporting server on the backend primary server (bootstrap):

    $ opscode-reporting-ctl reconfigure

    Note

    Starting with Reporting 1.6.0, the Chef MLSA must be accepted when reconfiguring the product. If the Chef MLSA has not already been accepted, the reconfigure process will prompt for a yes to accept it. Or run opscode-reporting-ctl reconfigure --accept-license to automatically accept the license.

  4. Copy the entire /etc/opscode-reporting directory from the backend primary server to all frontend and backend servers. For example, from each server run:

    $ scp -r <Bootstrap server IP>:/etc/opscode-reporting /etc

    or from the backend primary server:

    $ scp -r /etc/opscode-reporting <each servers IP>:/etc
  5. Reconfigure any Chef server on which Reporting services have been installed:

    $ chef-server-ctl reconfigure
  6. Reconfigure Reporting services on each server:

    $ opscode-reporting-ctl reconfigure
  7. Verify the installation:

    $ opscode-reporting-ctl test

Install Push Jobs

To set up the Chef push jobs server for a high availability configuration:

  1. Install the package on all servers that are running the Chef server. For example on Ubuntu:

    $ sudo dpkg -i opscode-push-jobs-server_2.1.0-1_amd64.deb
  2. Reconfigure the primary backend Chef push jobs server:

    $ opscode-push-jobs-server-ctl reconfigure
  3. Copy the entire /etc/opscode-push-jobs-server directory from the backend primary to all frontend and backend servers. For example, from each server run:

    $ scp -r <Bootstrap server IP>:/etc/opscode-push-jobs-server /etc

    or from the backend primary server:

    $ scp -r /etc/opscode-push-jobs-server <each servers IP>:/etc
  4. TCP protocol ports 10000 and 10003 must be open. These are the heartbeat and command ports respectively. They allow the Chef push jobs server to communicate with the Chef push jobs clients. In a configuration with both frontend and backend servers, these ports only need to be open on the backend servers. The Chef push jobs server waits for connections from the Chef push jobs client (and never makes a connection to a Chef push jobs client).

  5. Reconfigure the remaining Chef push jobs servers:

    $ opscode-push-jobs-server-ctl reconfigure
  6. Run the following command on each of the backend servers:

    $ chef-server-ctl reconfigure

    This ensures that the Keepalived scripts are regenerated so they are aware of Chef push jobs.

  7. Restart all servers on which Chef push jobs will run:

    $ chef-server-ctl restart opscode-pushy-server
  8. Verify the installation:

    $ opscode-push-jobs-server-ctl test

Reference

The following sections show an example chef-server.rb file and a list of the ports that are required by the Chef server.

chef-server.rb

A completed chef-server.rb configuration file for a four server tiered Chef server cluster, consisting of:

FQDN Real IP Address Cluster IP Address Role
be1.example.com 192.168.4.1 10.1.2.10 backend
be2.example.com 192.168.4.6 10.1.2.12 backend
fe1.example.com 192.168.4.2 frontend
fe2.example.com 192.168.4.3 frontend
fe3.example.com 192.168.4.4 frontend
chef.example.com 192.168.4.5 load balanced frontend VIP
be.example.com 192.168.4.7 load balanced backend VIP

Looks like this:

topology "ha"

server "be1.example.com",
  :ipaddress => "192.168.4.1",
  :role => "backend",
  :bootstrap => true,
  :cluster_ipaddress => "10.1.2.10"

server "be2.example.com",
  :ipaddress => "192.168.4.6",
  :role => "backend",
  :cluster_ipaddress => "10.1.2.12"

backend_vip "be.example.com",
  :ipaddress => "192.168.4.7",
  :device => "eth0"

server "fe1.example.com",
  :ipaddress => "192.168.4.2",
  :role => "frontend"

server "fe2.example.com",
  :ipaddress => "192.168.4.3",
  :role => "frontend"

server "fe3.example.com",
  :ipaddress => "192.168.4.4",
  :role => "frontend"

api_fqdn "chef.example.com"

Firewalls and Ports

All of the ports used by the Chef server are TCP ports. Refer to the operating system’s manual or site systems administrators for instructions on how to enable changes to ports, if necessary.

All services must be listening on the appropriate ports. Most monitoring systems provide a means of testing whether a given port is accepting connections and service-specific tools may also be available. In addition, the generic system tool Telnet can also be used to initiate the connection:

$ telnet HOST_NAME PORT

A single loopback interface should be configured using the 127.0.0.1 address. This ensures that all of the services are available to the Chef server, in the event that the Chef server attempts to contact itself from within a front or back end machine. All ports should be accessible through the loopback interface of their respective hosts.

Backend

For back-end servers, ensure that ports marked as external (marked as yes in the External column) are open and accessible via any firewalls that are in use:

Port Service Name, Description External
4321

bookshelf

The bookshelf service is an Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3)-compatible service that is used to store cookbooks, including all of the files—recipes, templates, and so on—that are associated with each cookbook.

yes
112

keepalived

The keepalived service manages the virtual IP address (VIP) between the backend machines in a high availability topology that uses DRBD.

yes
80, 443, 9683

nginx

The nginx service is used to manage traffic to the Chef server, including virtual hosts for internal and external API request/response routing, external add-on request routing, and routing between front- and back-end components.

Note

Port 9683 is used to internally load balance the oc_bifrost service.

yes
9683

oc_bifrost

The oc_bifrost service ensures that every request to view or manage objects stored on the Chef server is authorized.

yes
9090

oc-id

The oc-id service enables OAuth 2.0 authentication to the Chef server by external applications, including Chef Supermarket and Chef Analytics. OAuth 2.0 uses token-based authentication, where external applications use tokens that are issued by the oc-id provider. No special credentials—webui_priv.pem or privileged keys—are stored on the external application.

yes
8000

opscode-erchef

The opscode-erchef service is an Erlang-based service that is used to handle Chef server API requests to the following areas within the Chef server:

  • Cookbooks
  • Data bags
  • Environments
  • Nodes
  • Roles
  • Sandboxes
  • Search
yes

opscode-expander

The opscode-expander service is used to process data (pulled from the rabbitmq service’s message queue) so that it can be properly indexed by the opscode-solr4 service.

yes
8983

opscode-solr4

The opscode-solr4 service is used to create the search indexes used for searching objects like nodes, data bags, and cookbooks. (This service ensures timely search results via the Chef server API; data that is used by the Chef platform is stored in PostgreSQL.)

5432

postgresql

The postgresql service is used to store node, object, and user data.

yes
5672, 15672

rabbitmq

The rabbitmq service is used to provide the message queue that is used by the Chef server to get search data to Apache Solr so that it can be indexed for search. When Chef Analytics is confiugred, the rabbitmq service is also used to send data from the Chef server to the Chef Analytics server.

yes
16379

redis_lb

Key-value store used in conjunction with Nginx to route requests and populate request data used by the Chef server.

yes
7788-7799 DRBD This port range must be open between all back end servers in a high availability configuration that uses DRBD.

Frontend

For front-end servers, ensure that ports marked as external (marked as yes in the External column) are open and accessible via any firewalls that are in use:

Port Service Name, Description External
80, 443, 9683

nginx

The nginx service is used to manage traffic to the Chef server, including virtual hosts for internal and external API request/response routing, external add-on request routing, and routing between front- and back-end components.

Note

Port 9683 is used to internally load balance the oc_bifrost service.

yes
9463

oc_bifrost

The oc_bifrost service ensures that every request to view or manage objects stored on the Chef server is authorized.

9090

oc-id

The oc-id service enables OAuth 2.0 authentication to the Chef server by external applications, including Chef Supermarket and Chef Analytics. OAuth 2.0 uses token-based authentication, where external applications use tokens that are issued by the oc-id provider. No special credentials—webui_priv.pem or privileged keys—are stored on the external application.

8000

opscode-erchef

The opscode-erchef service is an Erlang-based service that is used to handle Chef server API requests to the following areas within the Chef server:

  • Cookbooks
  • Data bags
  • Environments
  • Nodes
  • Roles
  • Sandboxes
  • Search

GRE Tunnels

Warning

This option is sometimes necessary when the Chef server is configured for high availability using DRBD.

Occasionally, a GRE tunnel will be required to handle the VRRP traffic. To accomplish this, set the following in /var/opt/opscode/keepalived/bin/tunnel.sh on the back-end server that will be used for bootstrapping:

#!/bin/sh
ip tunnel add pc mode gre remote VRRP_IP_OF_PEER local MY_IP ttl 25
ip link set pc up
ip addr add 172.18.16.1 dev pc
ip route add 172.18.16.0/24 dev pc

Replace VRRP_IP_OF_PEER with the IP address of the server on the other end of the tunnel, and MY_IP with the IP address of the server on which the script will be located.

The 172.17.16.** network addresses used in the previous examples could be any unused reserved IP address space.

Set the following in /etc/opscode/chef-server.rb:

backend_vip "192.168.141.108",
  :ipaddress => "192.168.141.108",
  :device => "eth0"

And set the Keepalived unicast addresses to the GRE tunnel addresses.

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https://docs-archive.chef.io/release/server_12-8/install_server_ha_drbd.html