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Iteration utilities

Base.Iterators.zipFunction

zip(iters...)

For a set of iterable objects, returns an iterable of tuples, where the ith tuple contains the ith component of each input iterable.

Note that zip is its own inverse: collect(zip(zip(a...)...)) == collect(a).

julia> a = 1:5
1:5

julia> b = ["e","d","b","c","a"]
5-element Array{String,1}:
 "e"
 "d"
 "b"
 "c"
 "a"

julia> c = zip(a,b)
Base.Iterators.Zip2{UnitRange{Int64},Array{String,1}}(1:5, String["e", "d", "b", "c", "a"])

julia> length(c)
5

julia> first(c)
(1, "e")
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Base.Iterators.enumerateFunction

enumerate(iter)

An iterator that yields (i, x) where i is a counter starting at 1, and x is the ith value from the given iterator. It's useful when you need not only the values x over which you are iterating, but also the number of iterations so far. Note that i may not be valid for indexing iter; it's also possible that x != iter[i], if iter has indices that do not start at 1. See the enumerate(IndexLinear(), iter) method if you want to ensure that i is an index.

julia> a = ["a", "b", "c"];

julia> for (index, value) in enumerate(a)
           println("$index $value")
       end
1 a
2 b
3 c
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enumerate(IndexLinear(), A)
enumerate(IndexCartesian(), A)
enumerate(IndexStyle(A), A)

An iterator that accesses each element of the array A, returning (i, x), where i is the index for the element and x = A[i]. This is similar to enumerate(A), except i will always be a valid index for A.

Specifying IndexLinear() ensures that i will be an integer; specifying IndexCartesian() ensures that i will be a CartesianIndex; specifying IndexStyle(A) chooses whichever has been defined as the native indexing style for array A.

julia> A = ["a" "d"; "b" "e"; "c" "f"];

julia> for (index, value) in enumerate(IndexStyle(A), A)
           println("$index $value")
       end
1 a
2 b
3 c
4 d
5 e
6 f

julia> S = view(A, 1:2, :);

julia> for (index, value) in enumerate(IndexStyle(S), S)
           println("$index $value")
       end
CartesianIndex{2}((1, 1)) a
CartesianIndex{2}((2, 1)) b
CartesianIndex{2}((1, 2)) d
CartesianIndex{2}((2, 2)) e

Note that enumerate(A) returns i as a counter (always starting at 1), whereas enumerate(IndexLinear(), A) returns i as an index (starting at the first linear index of A, which may or may not be 1).

See also: IndexStyle, indices.

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Base.Iterators.restFunction

rest(iter, state)

An iterator that yields the same elements as iter, but starting at the given state.

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Base.Iterators.countfromFunction

countfrom(start=1, step=1)

An iterator that counts forever, starting at start and incrementing by step.

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Base.Iterators.takeFunction

take(iter, n)

An iterator that generates at most the first n elements of iter.

julia> a = 1:2:11
1:2:11

julia> collect(a)
6-element Array{Int64,1}:
  1
  3
  5
  7
  9
 11

julia> collect(Iterators.take(a,3))
3-element Array{Int64,1}:
 1
 3
 5
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Base.Iterators.dropFunction

drop(iter, n)

An iterator that generates all but the first n elements of iter.

julia> a = 1:2:11
1:2:11

julia> collect(a)
6-element Array{Int64,1}:
  1
  3
  5
  7
  9
 11

julia> collect(Iterators.drop(a,4))
2-element Array{Int64,1}:
  9
 11
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Base.Iterators.cycleFunction

cycle(iter)

An iterator that cycles through iter forever.

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Base.Iterators.repeatedFunction

repeated(x[, n::Int])

An iterator that generates the value x forever. If n is specified, generates x that many times (equivalent to take(repeated(x), n)).

julia> a = Iterators.repeated([1 2], 4);

julia> collect(a)
4-element Array{Array{Int64,2},1}:
 [1 2]
 [1 2]
 [1 2]
 [1 2]
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Base.Iterators.productFunction

product(iters...)

Returns an iterator over the product of several iterators. Each generated element is a tuple whose ith element comes from the ith argument iterator. The first iterator changes the fastest. Example:

julia> collect(Iterators.product(1:2,3:5))
2×3 Array{Tuple{Int64,Int64},2}:
 (1, 3)  (1, 4)  (1, 5)
 (2, 3)  (2, 4)  (2, 5)
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Base.Iterators.flattenFunction

flatten(iter)

Given an iterator that yields iterators, return an iterator that yields the elements of those iterators. Put differently, the elements of the argument iterator are concatenated. Example:

julia> collect(Iterators.flatten((1:2, 8:9)))
4-element Array{Int64,1}:
 1
 2
 8
 9
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Base.Iterators.partitionFunction

partition(collection, n)

Iterate over a collection n elements at a time.

julia> collect(Iterators.partition([1,2,3,4,5], 2))
3-element Array{Array{Int64,1},1}:
 [1, 2]
 [3, 4]
 [5]
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© 2009–2016 Jeff Bezanson, Stefan Karpinski, Viral B. Shah, and other contributors
Licensed under the MIT License.
https://docs.julialang.org/en/release-0.6/stdlib/iterators/