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Route

interface

A configuration object that defines a single route. A set of routes are collected in a Routes array to define a Router configuration. The router attempts to match segments of a given URL against each route, using the configuration options defined in this object.

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interface Route {
  path?: string
  pathMatch?: string
  matcher?: UrlMatcher
  component?: Type<any>
  redirectTo?: string
  outlet?: string
  canActivate?: any[]
  canActivateChild?: any[]
  canDeactivate?: any[]
  canLoad?: any[]
  data?: Data
  resolve?: ResolveData
  children?: Routes
  loadChildren?: LoadChildren
  runGuardsAndResolvers?: RunGuardsAndResolvers
}

Description

Supports static, parameterized, redirect, and wildcard routes, as well as custom route data and resolve methods.

For detailed usage information, see the Routing Guide.

Properties

Property Description
path?: string

The path to match against. Cannot be used together with a custom matcher function. A URL string that uses router matching notation. Can be a wild card (**) that matches any URL (see Usage Notes below). Default is "/" (the root path).

pathMatch?: string

The path-matching strategy, one of 'prefix' or 'full'. Default is 'prefix'.

By default, the router checks URL elements from the left to see if the URL matches a given path, and stops when there is a match. For example, '/team/11/user' matches 'team/:id'.

The path-match strategy 'full' matches against the entire URL. It is important to do this when redirecting empty-path routes. Otherwise, because an empty path is a prefix of any URL, the router would apply the redirect even when navigating to the redirect destination, creating an endless loop.

matcher?: UrlMatcher

A custom URL-matching function. Cannot be used together with path.

component?: Type<any>

The component to instantiate when the path matches. Can be empty if child routes specify components.

redirectTo?: string

A URL to which to redirect when a the path matches. Absolute if the URL begins with a slash (/), otherwise relative to the path URL. When not present, router does not redirect.

outlet?: string

Name of a RouterOutlet object where the component can be placed when the path matches.

canActivate?: any[]

An array of dependency-injection tokens used to look up CanActivate() handlers, in order to determine if the current user is allowed to activate the component. By default, any user can activate.

canActivateChild?: any[]

An array of DI tokens used to look up CanActivateChild() handlers, in order to determine if the current user is allowed to activate a child of the component. By default, any user can activate a child.

canDeactivate?: any[]

An array of DI tokens used to look up CanDeactivate() handlers, in order to determine if the current user is allowed to deactivate the component. By default, any user can deactivate.

canLoad?: any[]

An array of DI tokens used to look up CanLoad() handlers, in order to determine if the current user is allowed to load the component. By default, any user can load.

data?: Data

Additional developer-defined data provided to the component via ActivatedRoute. By default, no additional data is passed.

resolve?: ResolveData

A map of DI tokens used to look up data resolvers. See Resolve.

children?: Routes

An array of child Route objects that specifies a nested route configuration.

loadChildren?: LoadChildren

A LoadChildren object specifying lazy-loaded child routes.

runGuardsAndResolvers?: RunGuardsAndResolvers

Defines when guards and resolvers will be run. One of

  • paramsOrQueryParamsChange : Run when query parameters change.
  • always : Run on every execution. By default, guards and resolvers run only when the matrix parameters of the route change.

Usage notes

Simple Configuration

The following route specifies that when navigating to, for example, /team/11/user/bob, the router creates the 'Team' component with the 'User' child component in it.

[{
  path: 'team/:id',
 component: Team,
  children: [{
    path: 'user/:name',
    component: User
  }]
}]

Multiple Outlets

The following route creates sibling components with multiple outlets. When navigating to /team/11(aux:chat/jim), the router creates the 'Team' component next to the 'Chat' component. The 'Chat' component is placed into the 'aux' outlet.

[{
  path: 'team/:id',
  component: Team
}, {
  path: 'chat/:user',
  component: Chat
  outlet: 'aux'
}]

Wild Cards

The following route uses wild-card notation to specify a component that is always instantiated regardless of where you navigate to.

[{
  path: '**',
  component: WildcardComponent
}]

Redirects

The following route uses the redirectTo property to ignore a segment of a given URL when looking for a child path.

When navigating to '/team/11/legacy/user/jim', the router changes the URL segment '/team/11/legacy/user/jim' to '/team/11/user/jim', and then instantiates the Team component with the User child component in it.

[{
  path: 'team/:id',
  component: Team,
  children: [{
    path: 'legacy/user/:name',
    redirectTo: 'user/:name'
  }, {
    path: 'user/:name',
    component: User
  }]
}]

The redirect path can be relative, as shown in this example, or absolute. If we change the redirectTo value in the example to the absolute URL segment '/user/:name', the result URL is also absolute, '/user/jim'.

Empty Path

Empty-path route configurations can be used to instantiate components that do not 'consume' any URL segments.

In the following configuration, when navigating to /team/11, the router instantiates the 'AllUsers' component.

[{
  path: 'team/:id',
  component: Team,
  children: [{
    path: '',
    component: AllUsers
  }, {
    path: 'user/:name',
    component: User
  }]
}]

Empty-path routes can have children. In the following example, when navigating to /team/11/user/jim, the router instantiates the wrapper component with the user component in it.

Note that an empty path route inherits its parent's parameters and data.

[{
  path: 'team/:id',
  component: Team,
  children: [{
    path: '',
    component: WrapperCmp,
    children: [{
      path: 'user/:name',
      component: User
    }]
  }]
}]

Matching Strategy

The default path-match strategy is 'prefix', which means that the router checks URL elements from the left to see if the URL matches a specified path. For example, '/team/11/user' matches 'team/:id'.

[{
  path: '',
  pathMatch: 'prefix', //default
  redirectTo: 'main'
}, {
  path: 'main',
  component: Main
}]

You can specify the path-match strategy 'full' to make sure that the path covers the whole unconsumed URL. It is important to do this when redirecting empty-path routes. Otherwise, because an empty path is a prefix of any URL, the router would apply the redirect even when navigating to the redirect destination, creating an endless loop.

In the following example, supplying the 'full' pathMatch strategy ensures that the router applies the redirect if and only if navigating to '/'.

[{
  path: '',
  pathMatch: 'full',
  redirectTo: 'main'
}, {
  path: 'main',
  component: Main
}]

Componentless Routes

You can share parameters between sibling components. For example, suppose that two sibling components should go next to each other, and both of them require an ID parameter. You can accomplish this using a route that does not specify a component at the top level.

In the following example, 'MainChild' and 'AuxChild' are siblings. When navigating to 'parent/10/(a//aux:b)', the route instantiates the main child and aux child components next to each other. For this to work, the application component must have the primary and aux outlets defined.

[{
   path: 'parent/:id',
   children: [
     { path: 'a', component: MainChild },
     { path: 'b', component: AuxChild, outlet: 'aux' }
   ]
}]

The router merges the parameters, data, and resolve of the componentless parent into the parameters, data, and resolve of the children.

This is especially useful when child components are defined with an empty path string, as in the following example. With this configuration, navigating to '/parent/10' creates the main child and aux components.

[{
   path: 'parent/:id',
   children: [
     { path: '', component: MainChild },
     { path: '', component: AuxChild, outlet: 'aux' }
   ]
}]

Lazy Loading

Lazy loading speeds up application load time by splitting the application into multiple bundles and loading them on demand. To use lazy loading, provide the loadChildren property instead of the children property.

Given the following example route, the router will lazy load the associated module on demand using the browser native import system.

[{
  path: 'lazy',
  loadChildren: () => import('./lazy-route/lazy.module').then(mod => mod.LazyModule),
}];

© 2010–2019 Google, Inc.
Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0.
https://angular.io/api/router/Route